Plant Guide

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Shrub

pittosporum-eugenioides-variegatum

Pittosporum eugenioides 'Variegatum'

variegated tarata, variegated lemonwood

Bushy evergreen tree or shrub with variegated foliage. The leaves are 10-15 cm long, 2-4 cm wide, mid green, blotched along the wavy margins with creamy white. Foliage emits a lemon-like scent when crushed, hence the common name. Terminal clusters of honey-scented, 1-1.5 cm wide, pale yellow flowers during spring.

Pittosporum eugenioides is native to New Zealand where it occurs throughout the country along stream banks, forest margins and in forest clearings from sea level to about 600 m. The variegated form grows a bit slower than the species itself. It has a tapering habit when young, filling out to an open topped tree later on. 

Prefers a sunny or partially shaded position in any well-draining soil. Is more tolerant of damp and heavy soils than most other Pittosporum species, but growth will be compromised. Tolerates coastal conditions, moderately strong winds, and medium frosts.

Suitable for hedging or screening purposes. Good contrasting plant in mixed plantings. Also ideal as a specimen tree in particular when pruned to show off the pale grey bark.

Foliage is often used in floral arrangements.

pittosporum-tenuifolium-golfball

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Golf Ball'

Evergreen cultivar of the New Zealand native Pittosporum tenuifolium (kohuhu), forming a compact shrub with small light green oval leaves 2-3 cm long. Tiny black or purplish black flowers of about .6 cm across.

Prefers a sunny or semi-shaded position and well-draining soil. Moderately fast growing under average garden conditions. Growth rate is reduced in shade. Avoid wet sites. Responds well to trimming. Tolerates moderate frosts.

Lovely fresh green foliage plant. Tends to grow into a rounded shrub by itself, and with a little help it can be maintained as a perfect ball-shaped plant. A great alternative to the much slower-growing Buxus sempervirens.

pittosporum-tenuifolium-variegatum

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Variegatum'

variegated kohuhu, variegated tawhiwhi

Evergreen shrub or small tree with variegated foliage, native to New Zealand. Leaves are flat (as opposed to wavy like the species itself), greyish green with white margins, similar to Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Argenteum Variegatum' but larger and more pointed, to about 5 cm long. Small (to 1 cm wide) dark reddish-black, honey-scented fowers with reflexed petals in spring. Dark grey bark.

Prefers a sunny or semi-shaded position in any, well-draining soil. Tolerates medium frosts and is frost hardy throughout New Zealand. Pittosporum tenuifolium is not as tolerant as Pittosporum crassifolium of coastal conditions and strong winds, but copes reasonably well with dry conditions. Tends to loose its leaves if conditions are too wet.

Ideal as a specimen tree for foliage colour, or as a hedge or screening plant.

protea-neriifolia-limelight

Protea neriifolia 'Limelight'

Evergreen shrub with lanceolate leaves, flowering mainly during autumn and winter with creamy-green flower-heads with purple-red tufts on the bracts. Similar to, but a smaller shrub with smaller flowers than 'Green Ice'

'Limelight' (= 'Green Jade') is a cultivar developed in 1950 in New Zealand, originating from the oleander-leaved or narrow-leaved Protea neriifolia, which is endemic to South Africa.

Prefers a sunny position in acidic, and relatively poor soil. Any soil type is suitable but it must be well-draining. A yearly application of blood and bone in spring is recommended, but otherwise keep the nutrient levels low and don't apply any further fertilisers. In general, proteas dislike humidity, so a relatively windy site is ideal, since the wind keeps the humidity down. Staking will be required in very windy locations. No additional watering is necessary, except maybe in extremely dry summers. Mulch to keep the weeds down or grow as a lawn specimen, to limit the need to remove weeds around the plant and thus disturb its sensitive, shallow root system. They can be pruned quite heavily, but not beyond the foliage. Remove dead and damaged wood, as well as the by-pass shoots that the develop just below the flower-head. Suitable for coastal conditions.

Striking plant when in flower. Perfect for coastal gardens. The flowers (and foliage) last for ages on water. Just be careful not to "kill them by kindness"!

pseudopanax-linearifolius

Pseudopanax 'Linearifolius'

Erect growing evergreen New Zealand native shrub, probably a hybrid of Pseudopanax crassifolius and Pseudopanax lessonii. Leathery leaves with three to five (3-5 foliolate) long, narrow leaflets with serrated margins. Leaves may become 3-foliolate or even simple (i.e. a single leaf per node) as the plant matures.

Requires well-draining soil and is not tolerant of damp soil conditions. Grows well in any light situation from shade to full sun. Tolerates light to moderate frosts, coastal conditions, dry shade, and exposed sites.

Ideal tub plant. Great as a backdrop for smaller plants and useful as a contrast plant in particular when combined with large-leafed shrubs such as Griselinia lucida or Meryta sinclairii.

psoralea-pinnata

Psoralea pinnata

Dally pine, blue Psoralea, African scurf pea, blue pea, fountain bush, blue broom, taylorina, fonteinbos, penwortel

Evergreen shrub or small tree in the legume family, with bright green, soft, needle-like leaves. Flowering in early spring with blue and white or lilac and white, pea-like, bee-attracting, scented flowers (to 1.5 cm across) clustered at the ends of the branches. The flowers are followed by small, wrinkled seedpods that each contain a seed. Psoralea pinnata is native to South Africa where it occurs naturally along streams and wet places (i.e. winter-wet areas). It has established itself in other regions of the world such as Southern Australia and the north of New Zealand where it is regarded as a weed. Psoralea pinnata tolerates a wide range of growing conditions, including wind, drought, high rainfall, coastal conditions, and poor soils. Because it is a nitrogen-fixer, it changes the growing environment for the original native plant species that may no longer be able to compete as a result. Germination is stimulated by fire. The pant is relatively short-lived (about 10 years).

Psoralea pinnata prefers a sunny position, except in areas with very high summer temperatures where a partially shaded site is better. Tolerates waterlogged soils, but also copes with occasional drought once estabished. Prune after flowering. Self-seeds quite easily. Tolerates light to moderate frosts (zones 9-11).

Striking tree when in flower. You may need to give it some help in the form of pruning and training to develop a good shape as it does not appear to do so naturally and often has a somewhat straggly, unbalanced appearance.

rhaphiolepis-indica-enchantress

Rhaphiolepis indica 'Enchantress'

pink Indian hawthorn

One of the cultivars of Rhaphiolepis indica, the Indian hawthorn, a tough evergreen shrub from to southern China. 'Enchantress' is also known as 'Pinkie'. Thick, leathery, oblong leaves with toothed margins, dark green above, olive green beneath, developing a bronze tinge later in winter. Star-shaped, 5-petalled, pink with white flowers, 2-3 cm across, in clusters at the ends of branches, mainly during spring. Flowers are followed by small dark blue berries. Most named cultivars of Rhaphiolepis indica are smaller-growing than the species itself which usually reaches a height of about 2.5 m, but can grow even taller in suitable growing conditions.

Prefers a position in full sun and well-draining soil. In extremely hot climates, a partially shaded position is better. Tolerates coastal conditions, wind exposure, and relatively dry soils once established. Trim once a year after flowering to keep compact. Withstands hard pruning. Resents root disturbance.  Moderate frosts to about -10 deg C.  

Great choice for a coastal hedge. Also suitable as a filler, clipped specimen, container plant, or a shrub for flower display after the winter-flowering plants have stopped flowering, and just before the roses begin to flower.  

 

rosa-absolutely-fabulous

Rosa 'Absolutely Fabulous'

Repeat-flowering floribunda rose with glossy mid green foliage and old-fashioned, butter yellow flowers with an unusual sweet anise-licorice scent. Flowers have 30-45 petals, and are about 10 cm across. Neat, rounded growing habit and self-cleaning (petals of spent flowers drop off).

Registration name: Rosa 'WEKvossutono'. Bred by Tom Carruth (USA). Introduced in Australia as Rosa 'Soul Mate' and in the USA as Rosa 'Julia Child'. Master chef Julia Child selected this rose herself to bear her name. Known as Rosa 'Absolutely Fabulous' in the UK and New Zealand.

Prefers a sunny position in any well-draining soil with a generous amount of organic matter. Good mildew and blackspot resistance. Heat tolerant. Fertilise in early spring and again in early summer. Dead-head during the flowering season and prune in winter.

Gorgeous rose for flower display, flowering prolifically throughout the season. Can be grown as a standard or a shrub in garden beds or borders, as a single specimen or en masse. Good for cutting. Suitable for containers.

rosa-andrea-jane

Rosa 'Andrea Jane'

Hybrid tea rose, flowering in flushes throughout the season with showy, delicately perfumed flowers and dark green foliage. Large, 10-14 cm wide, double flowers with creamy white and pale yellow petals and rosy pink edges.  

Registration name: Rosa 'MACberli'. Bred by Sam McGredy (New Zealand).

Prefers a position in full sun and any well-draining soil with a generous amount of organic matter. Frost-hardy, but may need some protection from spring frosts in cold climates. Dead-head during the flowering season and prune in winter.

Gorgeous full flowers with beautiful colour combinations. Good for sunny beds and borders. Excellent for cutting.

rosa-class-act

Rosa 'Class Act'

Vigorous, but well-behaved floribunda rose with dark green foliage, flowering continuously throughout the season with small clusters. Yellow buds with a hint of reddish, opening to semi-double, pale lemon yellow to white flowers, gradually revealing yellow stamens. Very faint fragrance only. Attractive hips.

Bred by William A. Marriner (USA, 1988). Registered as Rosa 'JACare'. Also traded as Rosa 'First Class' or Rosa 'White Magic'.

Prefers a sunny or lightly shaded position in any, well-draining soil with a generous amount of organic matter. Fertilise in early spring, and again in early summer. Dead-head during the season. Good disease resistance. Prune in winter or early spring. Frost-hardy; tolerates -20 deg C. 

Rosa 'Class Act' is a very classy rose with strong, straight stems and beautiful, long-pointed buds with delicate colour combinations of yellow and a little bit of red. Initially the flowers themselves are white with a pale yellow sheen, maturing to white and opening to show the yellow stamens.  Good all-round performer in groups or as a single specimen in beds, borders, or containers. Suitable for cutting. 

rosa-dark-moments

Rosa 'Dark Moments'

Vigorous floribunda rose with glossy dark green foliage and russet brown flowers with a clove-like fragrance. Flowers are medium-sized, and are produced throughout the season in both small and large clusters. May produce long stems in autumn, reducing flower production later in the season.

Registration name: Rosa 'Simdamo'. Bred by Nola Simpson (New Zealand) from a cross between Rosa 'Mary Sumner' and Rosa 'Kirsty Jayne'.

Prefers a sunny position in any well-draining soil with a generous amount of organic matter. Fertilise in early spring and again in early summer. Dead-head during the flowering season and prune in winter. Good disease resistance, but may get some powdery mildew. Grows wider than many other roses, so needs to be given sufficient space.

Who wouldn't like a rose with flowers in the colour of dark chocolate! The flowers hold their unusual colour well (unlike some other brown roses). Good for cutting. 

rosa-dear-one

Rosa 'Dear One'

Floribunda rose, free-flowering in flushes throughout the season with soft pink flowers, fading to white. Flowers have a mild fragrance.

Registration name: Rosa 'CAMalpha'.  Cross between Rosa 'Sexy Rexy' and Rosa 'Valentine Heart'. Bred by David Benny (New Zealand).

Prefers a sunny position in any well-draining soil with a generous amount of organic matter. May be somewhat slow in getting established. Fertilise in early spring and again in early summer. Dead-head during the flowering season and prune in winter.

Very pretty rose with exquisitely shaped flowers. Lovely shrub for flower display in garden beds and borders.

rosa-easy-going

Rosa 'Easy Going'

Repeat-flowering floribunda rose with a rounded habit, lightly perfumed flowers and glossy bright green foliage. Flowers with about 25-30 wavy, apricot-coloured petals, 10 cm wide. Grows on its own root system.

Registration name: Rosa 'HARflow'. Developed by Harkness (UK) from a sport of Rosa 'Fellowship' (=Rosa 'Livin' Easy'), and is very similar in every way except for the flower colour.

Prefers a position in full sun and any well-draining soil with a generous amount of organic matter. Fertilise in early spring and again in early summer. Dead-head during the flowering season and prune in winter. Good disease resistance.

Combines beautifully with blue or mauve flowering plants such as delphiniums, lavenders and catnip. Great in groups or as a single specimen for flower display in borders. Excellent for cutting. Suitable for containers. Can be grown as a standard.

rosa-fellowship

Rosa 'Fellowship'

Repeat-flowering floribunda rose with glossy mid to dark green foliage and scented flowers. Bright, dark orange flower buds open to two-toned, 9 cm wide flowers with ruffled petals, apricot orange with yellow towards the center. Flowers are solitary or produced in clusters. Moderate citrus fragrance. Grows on its own root system.  

Registration name: Rosa 'HARwelcome', bred by Harkness (UK). Rosa 'Fellowship' was named for the Rotary movement in the UK, but was introduced as Rosa 'Livin' Easy' in the USA.

Prefers a position in full sun and any well-draining soil with a generous amount of organic matter. Fertilise in early spring and again in early summer. Good disease resistance, including black spot. Dead-head during the flowering season and prune to about 1/3 height in early winter.

Free-flowering rose with gorgeous colour combinations of perfectly formed dark orange buds with lighter orange and yellow mature flowers. Suitable for flower display in beds, borders or containers. Great for cutting.

rosa-flower-carpet-pink

Rosa 'Flower Carpet Pink'

Bushy rose with wide-spreading, arching branches. Carmine pink, semi-double flowers, 3-4 cm wide, in large clusters throughout the season. Glossy mid to dark green foliage.

Bred by Werner Noack (Germany). Registered as Rosa 'NOAtraum'. Commercially available as Rosa 'Flower Carpet Pink', 'Blooming Carpet', 'Emera', 'Emera Pavement', 'Foral Carpet, and 'Heidetraum'.

Suitable for a sunny or partially shaded position in any well-draining soil with a generous amount of organic matter. Fertilise in early spring, and again in early summer. Excellent disease resistance. Remove spent flower clusters to promote subsequent flower production, or leave on the shrub to eventually reveal small, dark orange hips. Prune during winter. 

Rosa 'Flower Carpet Pink' is an easy care rose, covered with masses of brilliant pink flowers from late spring to late autumn. Unfortunately the flowers are not fragrant. No particular skill is required to grow and care for this top performer. To prune; simply reduce the height of the shrub to about 1/3 of its height. Although this rose is generally marketed as a ground-cover shrub, remember that it can grow to about 0.5-1 m in one season. The rose in the photos grows in a position that only receives late afternoon sunlight in summer, and none for the rest of the year.